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Amy Myers

A Hydromelodic Event

Malin Gallery - Aspen

June 4 - July 23, 2022

Amy Myers  Sorestrine, 2022  Oil on canvas  60 x 60"

Amy Myers

Sorestrine, 2022

Oil on canvas

60 x 60"

Amy Myers  Dirac Vedam, 2022  Oil on canvas  60 x 60 in.

Amy Myers

Dirac Vedam, 2022

Oil on canvas

60 x 60 in.

Amy Myers  A Hydromelodic Event, 2022  Oil on canvas  60 x 60 in.

Amy Myers

A Hydromelodic Event, 2022

Oil on canvas

60 x 60 in.

Amy Myers  Silviuniverse, 2019  Oil on canvas  72 x 72 in.

Amy Myers

Silviuniverse, 2019

Oil on canvas

72 x 72 in.

Amy Myers  Mirrored Daughter, 2019  Oil on canvas  72 x 72 in.

Amy Myers

Mirrored Daughter, 2019

Oil on canvas

72 x 72 in.

Amy Myers  Fearful Symmetry, 2001  Graphite gouache on paper  95 x 93 in.

Amy Myers

Fearful Symmetry, 2001

Graphite gouache on paper

95 x 93 in.

Press Release

Malin Gallery | Aspen is pleased to present Amy Myers: A Hydromelodic Event. On view through July 23rd, the exhibition includes five large new paintings on canvas and a monumentally-scaled work on paper. A Hydromelodic Event is the artist’s second solo exhibition with the gallery.

Known for her intricate large-scale drawings, Amy Myers creates elaborate images replete with visual allusions to various fields of scientific inquiry including theoretical physics, ontology, neuroscience and anatomy. As the daughter of a physicist and an aviator, Myers was raised in an environment suffused with scientific theory. Coexisting with the ratiocinative elements of Myers' images are ethereal and meditative qualities and a pervasive femininity. Employing concepts from theoretical physics as a "springboard into the the imagination," Myers strives to render ineffable dimensions or states of being, describing her artistic visions as "fluid to the point of indeterminacy and infinite to the point of transcendence.”

Though Myers’ primary conceptual starting point is theoretical physics, she modulates between a range of scientific frameworks in her approach. Echoing the fact that all matter is composed of mostly empty space, Myers’ compositions evoke motion, fluidity and a startling sense of void. Looping, recumbent trajectories suggest the paths of quantum particles with form derived from motion. Myers’ immersion in particle physics since childhood has yielded a highly singular approach to rendering matter, wherein form is fundamentally considered as a consequence of subatomic motion, collisions, particulate interplay and energy transfers. As the artist notes,

"The perspective of particle physics is one of a universe without stuff. All particles exist with the potential to combine with and become different particles. They are intermediate states in a network of interactions and are based upon events, not things."

While Myers’ approach to depicting mass and form is informed by consideration of subatomic dynamics, the primacy of negative space within her work simultaneously evokes the celestial. Thus, her images collapse and commingle the infinitely microscopic and macroscopic in a manner that cannot be disentangled by the viewer, with his or her perspective constantly shifting between the universe in a grain of sand or the universe itself in its infinite expanse.

In Myers’ hands, such ideas yield forms that are suffused with the contingent or indeterminate. Though rooted in quantitative theory, the notion that the universe’s constituents are simultaneously everywhere and nowhere leads towards the stubbornly nonempirical realm of the metaphysical. Such ethereal domains are referenced in Myers’ paintings with visual allusions to totemic symbology. Also frequently embedded within Myers’ works are anatomic-seeming forms. Though these forms have an innately feminine character, they remain more referential than literal.

Critic Miriam Brumer describes Myers’ imagery as follows:

"Consciously, [Myers] refers to subatomic particles, galactic forces and sexual organs, but what our eyes perceive is a magically engendered, non-specific world, in which elements tenuously exist in an activated space and in a constant state of metamorphosis. She may be thinking about science, but what she has evolved is a mysterious and tenuous world."

The painting A Hydromelodic Event (2022) was inspired by the artist’s reflections on the interactions of subatomic particles, whose transformations render all matter “fluid” rather than “fixed.” Notes Myers, “The world is not made of stone but an endless recombining of elements and energy.” She explores similar themes in Dirac Vedam (2022), which she describes as “a painting caught between phases of change” illustrating a “flux pattern,” which can simultaneously exist in multiple states.

Silviuniverse (2019) is, in Myers’ words, an “exploration into energy” inspired by the mysterious subatomic particle called the Neutrino. The prevailing “Standard Model” of quantum physics postulated Neutrinos to be massless particles traveling at the speed of light. Tests conducted at the Super-Kamiokande Observatory in Japan in 1988 revealed Neutrinos to carry an almost infinitely small mass - making them approximately a million times lighter than an electron. Neutrinos are in fact so light that they rarely interact with other matter at all; trillions of Neutrinos pass freely through the human body every second without ill effect. The source of Neutrino mass remains unknown, and Myers is fascinated by their connection to the 4th dimension, which humans are unable to perceive spatially but functions (within the Theory of Relativity) as time.

Illustrating Myers’ tendency to modulate between micro- and macro- frameworks, Mirrored Daughter (2019) addresses the universal. The pattern in Mirrored Daughter is based on a recursive system similar to the Julian Set, which is integral to the field of complex dynamics and underlies fractal systems. A curious feature of the Julian Set is its status as a full set that encompasses a non-set. Myers comments regarding the Julian Set that “its sum is always non-sensical and reads as infinite; thus - a mirrored universe.”

"[Myers'] feminine fantasies are as delicate as lacework, as eloquent as a bridal gown, as spectacular as fireworks, and as uninhabitable as a distant planet... Her constellations atomize into a spinning, vibrating abstraction that draws you irresistibly toward an ever-widening interiority—a near-infinite, yet intimate, space of dizzying electromagnetic seduction." -Eric Fischl

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